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Pit bull advocacy group seeks to change laws, perception

When Stephanie Heath Higgins met Grace, she could barely hold up her head. The pit bull, at 7 or 8 years old, should have weighed around 60 pounds. But Grace weighed about 30. She was emaciated, dehydrated, suffering from an eye infection. She couldn’t walk. Her organs were shutting down. But Higgins loved her anyway.

3 Votes
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Liverpool specters return to educate, entertain

You can meet the most interesting folks here in Liverpool, and they don't even have to be alive. The Onondaga Historical Association is preparing its 13th annual Ghostwalk, and the spirits will be summoned right here in the village of Liverpool. The walks will take place on Friday, Sept. 28, Saturday, Sept.29, Friday, Oct. 5 and Saturday, Oct. 6. While the evening tours are scheduled for 6 p.m., on Saturday, Oct. 6, an afternoon tour commences at 2 p.m.

2 Votes
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Paul de Lima coffee: A hometown product to be proud of

When we first moved to the Syracuse area two years ago, one of the many questions I asked myself was whether I would ever find a cup of coffee in my new hometown that I liked as much as in my old hometown, namely the coffee I would purchase on my way to work each morning at a gas station-convenience store. A trivial dilemma, yes, but not for a coffee lover who needs one small cup o' Joe to get going in the early morning hours. Their coffee was always fresh, and, to me, absolutely perfect. So, as we started to get used to our new home, I began sampling the different coffees available in this area and soon noticed that many diners and restaurants were serving something called Paul de Lima coffee, and I really liked it. When we just happened to stumble upon their outlet store and museum, located in Cicero, I liked it even more; here was a hometown product to be proud of, a great coffee at a great price, plus a store and little museum to boot!

2 Votes

Gray Matters: In praise of church suppers

The aroma's in the air! The signs are everywhere! Ah, one of my favorite seasons of the year has begun yet again. No, I'm not referring to the holiday season, Thanksgiving, Christmas or even football. I'm talking “church supper season,” that autumnal odyssey of comfort food and good company. Today's column features these very successful fundraisers, which are also wonderful gatherings for socializing and sampling homemade specialties at very fair prices.

2 Votes

GUEST COLUMN: Salina cat problem is caused by the town

Here we go again. The Salina cat problem and its mismanagement by the town. This time it’s Thomas Avenue. This has been a problem area for years, but one woman saw the problem and decided to do something about it. Over the past 10 years she has trapped some 32 cats and kittens, adopting out those who were tame. The remainder have been neutered, vaccinated and returned to their territory. She could have simply ignored the problem or complained about it, as her neighbors did. But her “TNR” (trap-neuter-return, used for feral or “community” cats) program took her from 32 cats to seven. But it wasn’t good enough.

1 Vote
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New highway policy will extend the life of Cicero’s roads

Spring is on its way out and summer is just around the corner. Like many other northern clime communities, the town of Cicero has embarked on its road maintenance program for the season. What is different this year is that the town board and the highway department joined forces to develop a comprehensive plan to deal with our failing infrastructure. It has been apparent for some time that our roads were deteriorating much faster than the pace at which they were being repaired. Specifically, the problem was that only two to three miles of road were being repaired each year, but, with 130 miles of road, it would take 45 to 65 years to get to all them. And there is no road that lasts 45 years, so a new approach had to be implemented — and quickly.

1 Vote

LETTER: Toxoplasmosis is no great community health threat

To the editor: I don't take the threat of disease lightly. A recent letter regarding cats and the spread of toxoplasmosis was worrisome, so I did a little sleuthing. According to the website for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "In the United States it is estimated that 22.5 percent of the population 12 years and older have been infected with Toxoplasma." That's one out of five of us —worrisome indeed! "Of those who are infected, very few have symptoms because a healthy person's immune system usually keeps the parasite from causing illness."

1 Vote

TOPS Markets provide senior-friendly shopping, services

Once a person retires, life can change dramatically. For one thing, there is usually less money coming in and senior citizens often have to make do with less, and look for ways to down-size and live more economically. Since retired or semi-retired folks, for the most part, have more free time on their hands, we (and I count myself as a member of this group) look for ways to be more frugal, yet still shop wisely without impacting our quality of life in a negative way. This senior tip focuses on a local grocery chain that recognizes senior citizens as a sizeable and important share of their clientele and has rewarded them in some very creative and positive ways.

1 Vote
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CNY SPD Parent-Connections offers support for parents of children with sensory processing disorders

When Caryn Daher’s son, Jon, was little, he was into everything — even more than the average toddler. “He was… constantly bumping and crashing into things and people and seeking-jumping type activities,” said Daher, a Cicero resident. “He had difficulty in regulating and responding to movement activities appropriately. It went far beyond a ‘busy’ toddler.” In addition, Jon struggled with a variety of sounds, often withdrawing or avoiding certain situations because of the noise level. He had higher-than-average sensitivities to food, temperature and touch. In addition, his speech was delayed. It was that delay that led to help for his other issues. Through his speech therapist, Jon was diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder.

1 Vote
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An artist in our midst: Behind the Red Door: Meet Jenifer Herman

It was just over a year ago when Jenifer Herman, proprietor of Red Door Artisans decided to tear down the original farmhouse (childhood home of both her mom and grandmother) in order to build what was to become a new home for local artists and artisans to showcase and sell their creations. Sitting in the center of a parcel of land that holds the current homes of Herman and her siblings, the old farmhouse needed too much work to make for a suitable contemporary home, but it was an ideal spot to grow her family homestead into a small family business. When the property was being readied for demolition, Herman went through and found objects that would be of later use — old doorknobs, bric-a-brac and, the one most important piece, her grandmother’s original red door, which she had thrown into her garage waiting for the time when she would need it.

1 Vote

C-NS track sides sweep home meet

Liverpool steps up for second place in girls portion

It had not yet warmed up, nor had it dried out too much, by the time Cicero-North Syracuse’s track and field teams hosted its 10th annual Relays last Friday at Bragman Stadium.

1 Vote

LPL group to vote on dissolution after inability to reach agreement with board

After months of negotiations, the Liverpool Public Library board of trustees and Friends group were unable to come up with a memorandum of understanding that would formalize the relationship between the two entities. As a result, the Friends group will hold a vote on its own dissolution at its Jan. 14 meeting.

1 Vote

Petition calls for Dyce’s firing

A Change.org petition calling for the North Syracuse superintendent’s firing has garnered more than 100 signatures. The petition, started by James Smith, asks the North Syracuse Central School District Board of Education to terminate the contract of Dr. Kim Dyce Faucette, who became the district’s superintendent in August of 2011. Her contract is set to expire next summer.

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Senior Fair draws record crowd

The Senior Fair, which took place this year on Sept. 27 in the Horticultural Building at the New York State Fairgrounds, was originated back in 2004 when State Sen. John DeFrancisco saw a need to bring seniors together, not just for fun and entertainment, because there is plenty of that, but for all the information and help they might be seeking from the people and the organizations who routinely address seniors' special interests.

1 Vote
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BOCES students offer good, cheap salon services for seniors

One of the little-known secrets to save big bucks when trying to improve one's appearance is to visit your local BOCES. The BOCES hair and nail salon, if you’re lucky enough to have one fairly close by, is invaluable to those of us looking to save some money in our senior years. Almost within walking distance for me here in the village of Liverpool is the OCM-BOCES (Onondaga-Cortland-Madison Board of Cooperative Educational Services) Career Training Center, located on Crown Road in Liverpool.

1 Vote

Clay holds annual history camp

The week of July 9, seven girls and seven boys from around town made some wonderful memories. Under the direction of Cindy Redhead, chairperson of this year’s History Camp, and nine volunteers and helpers, they were kept very busy for five days learning about the Civil War as it related to Clay.

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St. Joe’s parishioner lights up the night for the holidays

Drive down Cedarpost Road next to the Wegmans on West Taft Road at night this month, and you will notice a house at the corner of Harvest Lane. In fact, it would be pretty difficult not to notice it. The house and the lawn are blanketed in Christmas decorations and lights — lots and lots and lots of lights. “[We’ve got] somewhere between 10,000 and 20,000,” estimates St. Joseph the Worker parishioner John Bianco, the house's owner and architect of “lights on the corner.”

1 Vote

New development in Bridgeport

Just recently, the Cicero Town Board passed a resolution that will clear the way for a new development called Lyons Farm just west of the hamlet of Bridgeport. I began working with the developer of this project several months ago to pave the way for this approval. This is exciting news for the Bridgeport area and the town of Cicero as a whole.

1 Vote

LETTER: TNR is successful enough for this resident

To the editor: [In response to “TNR is not the best answer for Salina cat problem,” July 10]: A reply to this article: 1. TNR never claims to completely eliminate feral cats. It is impossible. If you killed every cat in America and missed one male and one female, it would take about a decade to get back up to 90 million. Cats are very fertile creatures. Trying to get the population down by "removing" them is doomed to failure. It is a war we cannot win.

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