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North Syracuse Village Center streetscaping specs approved

At their Aug. 14 meeting, North Syracuse village trustees approved specifications for the Village Center’s Streetscape Improvements project funded by $850,000 from Onondaga County’s Save the Rain Program. The trustees also extended the deadline for bids from contractors to Sept. 3.

EPA proposes PCB cleanup plan for Lower Ley Creek portion of Onondaga Lake Superfund Site

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a plan to clean up contaminated soil and sediment at the Lower Ley Creek area of the Onondaga Lake Superfund Site located in the town of Salina. Discharges from nearby industries and a landfill have contaminated the soil and sediment with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other hazardous substances. PCBs are potentially cancer-causing chemicals that can build up in the tissue of fish and other wildlife and pose a threat to people who eat them. The EPA proposal calls for a combination of excavation, capping and disposal of contaminated soil and sediment.

Upside-down flag at American Diner signals distress

According to the United States Flag Code approved by Congress in July 1976, “The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.” Well, there’s nothing dangerous about eating home fries and hash browns at the American Diner, 214 Oswego St., so why is its Stars and Stripes hanging upside down?

Trustee hopes streetscaping starts soon at North Syracuse Village Center

North Syracuse Village Trustee Gary Butterfield is anxious to get the Village Center’s streetscaping project underway. Earlier this year, the village received approximately $850,000 from Onondaga County’s Save the Rain Program to pay for the Village Center Streetscape Improvements. At their July 10 meeting, village trustees declined to approve specifications for the work which will focus on a half-mile stretch on Main Street from Fergerson Avenue north to Gertrude Street.

Cicero looks to revise sign code

In order to make their town more business-friendly, members of the Cicero Town Board are looking to revise the town code pertaining to signs.

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Phase I of Brewerton Revitalization Project unveiled

After eight years of waiting, the residents of Brewerton are finally seeing progress on the revitalization of the hamlet. Town and state officials held a ribbon-cutting ceremony July 2 to commemorate the completion of Phase I of the Brewerton Revitalization Project, which includes picnic tables, new streetlights, a 400-foot brick walkway and benches along the riverfront. The improvements cost a total of $102,400, which was made possible through matching grants to the town of Cicero, in-kind services from local businesses and town departments and donations from Brewerton residents.

Change is the name of the game in banking

This month, Seneca Federal Savings and Loan Association, celebrating 85 years of service locally, will change its name to Seneca Savings. The old hometown bank has locations at 105 Second St. in Liverpool, 201 N. Main St. in North Syracuse and another one in Baldwinsville.

County-village agreement OKs public use of Griffin, Salt Museum lots

At its June 16 meeting, the Liverpool Village Board of Trustees approved two measures designed to encourage development on the basin block bounded by First and South Willow streets and Lake Drive. They passed a local law allowing site review applicants — who must demonstrate that enough nearby parking exists to accommodate customers — to count parking spaces located on-street and/or in municipal parking lots within 500 feet of the site. The new law, Local Law C, allows site-plan applicants to count up to 50 percent of their required parking that way.

Parade of Homes once again comes to town of Clay

It’s the hope of every builder to be a part of Central New York’s Parade of Homes, where they can show off their distinctive style to discerning buyers and designers. But it’s also the hope of every municipality to be the home of the prestigious tour, meant to showcase not only construction techniques and interior design, but neighborhoods and local amenities.

Cicero announces new businesses

It must be Cicero because we continue to be blessed with an attraction for new and expanding businesses. Some have recently opened and others are slated to open in the very near future or later this year. A recent addition is Empire Tractor, located on East Crabtree Lane. This is a small tractor business selling Kubota lawn tractors and other related equipment. Another recent opening is The Meadows, located at the intersection of Route 31 and Lakeshore Drive (formerly the site of Dunkin’ Donuts). This is a custard and frozen yogurt shop, with a drive-through, walk up window, and inside seating. Coffee will also be served starting at 5:30 a.m. The Meadows is a franchise operation with its headquarters in Pennsylvania. The Meadows in Cicero is the franchise’s first store in New York state.

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Solar panels finally active; system will save town of Clay about $16,000 a year

The irony wasn’t lost on Damian Ulatowski. On Earth Day, April 22, when dozens of residents and local dignitaries gathered to hear the Clay supervisor talk about the town’s new solar panel array, the sun was nowhere to be seen. Despite the gloomy weather, the town unveiled its new 99kW solar array at Town Hall and the highway garage to reduce and stabilize energy costs. The project was launched through a partnership with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and Warner Energy LLC, a Clay-based business that designs and develops solar project for clients nationwide.

Education aid and tax relief needed for CNY

Times are tough, and families are doing everything they can just to make ends meet. The particularly harsh winter didn’t help, driving utility bills through the roof and making the cost-of-living even less affordable. Central New York families have struggled for long enough. That’s why I fought for a state budget that includes funding for vital programs and initiatives to relieve the burden on hardworking families.

Tax incentives are being misused

It is no secret that New York’s residents and businesses are over taxed. For years, businesses and residents have been leaving New York for tax-friendly states. The fiscal problems the State of New York faces are no different than other states across the country; yet, New York continues to over spend and goes so far as to ask local municipalities to shoulder much of the financial burden from those decisions. Local representatives at the state and federal level are desperately trying to change the business climate in New York by offering tax credits and incentive packages for relocating businesses to New York, creating jobs, and improving the skill level of employees. As an advocate for the free market approach to business, I applaud the intent underpinning these programs (the encouragement of business activity in New York state), but I am apprehensive about the precedent and disparate treatment the tax credits and incentives are creating.

Stormwater, parking top concerns for JGB Properties’ basin block project

When you plan to build on the site of an old Oswego Canal side-cut basin, you know that stormwater drainage will be a concern. When you plan three new buildings with a mix of residential, office and retail spaces on a block already home to a dozen businesses including four restaurants, parking spaces will also be a concern. At the March 24 Liverpool Village Planning Board meeting, JGB Properties shared details of its proposed development on the basin block bordered by First and South Willow streets and Lake Drive.

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JGB Properties plans three new mixed-use buildings on basin block

At the March 24 Liverpool Village Planning Board meeting, JGB Properties prepared to share details of its proposed development on the basin block bordered by First and South Willow streets and Lake Drive. Plans drawn up by Keplinger Freeman Associates, an East Syracuse landscape architectural firm, call for the construction of three buildings, two along lower First Street and one on South Willow.

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